Art


I’ve been on a learning binge lately which has been fun. Recently I signed up for an on-line class in Shibori techniques. I’ve done some woven shibori in the past, but never the traditional techniques on silk.

I’m in the second week of a 5-week session and it’s been a blast.  Not only is Glennis a wonderful teacher, the class of people from all over the world has been enthusiastic and very creative.  Glennis designed the on-line class to be a weekly uploaded teaching pdf document with embedded videos and a blog where we all share ideas.

The first class was about using clamped resists on silk samples using ColorHue Dyes.  I wasn’t thrilled with the pale results.

The itajime technique was difficult for me with all the clamps and shapes, but fun nonetheless.

Last week in Lesson 2, Glennis introduced three different techniques using hand stitching–mokume (rows of running stitches, similar to woven shibori), makiage (pattern within a motif), and orinui (overcast stitching on a fold).  This was more my style. I love to sew, these techniques give me much more control, and an additional video gave me much more information on how to increase the intensity of the color.

The photos show the initial stitching, everything gathered and dyed, and the unveiling which I’m crazy about!

I’m very pleased that the color was so intense.  The blue sample was simply dyed, but the other two were immersed up to a point and the rest of was painted.  Fascinating how it all works.

This summer I’ll be attended an indigo dye workshop and I’m sure I’ll be bringing plenty of work from the techniques I learn over the next few weeks to place in the dye pot.

I will continue to post with each new technique learned.  Stay tuned.

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Ann Arbor continues as a blogging theme this week because there was so much to see and do.  I can’t conclude this series without mentioning the delightful time we had at the Ann Arbor Sunday Artists Market in Kerrytown. 

On a leisurely Sunday morning, my husband and I strolled through the market looking at all the beautiful handmade items.  I was very fortunate to stumble upon this woman, making lovely baskets for sale.

Rose Clawson owns Baskets by Rose, a small company featuring her flat reed, handmade baskets.  I thought her prices were very reasonable too, so at the end of our visit, we walked back to our hotel with this lovely basket that now sits at the side of my loom holding supplies.

Shopping makes you hungry, so we walked into the covered food market and ordered from this crazy menu at the Kosmo Lunch Counter and the B-Bim-Bop was divine.

Good food, great handmade crafts.  It was a terrific morning.

If you’ve been reading my blog for a while, you know that I am fascinated by sacred geometry in nature.  In general, it is the thought that God designed nature in such a way that it follows geometric/mathematical principles.  My garden is a great source of inspiration on this level.  And there is no better example than the incredible sunflowers in bloom.

Can you see the amazing spirals in the middle of the flowers?  They are perfectly formed!  And the center blooms from outside to inside the circle as the bees plant themselves for a drunken feast.

As a weaver, I know many principles of sacred geometry and the fibonacci series are used in designing textiles and wall pieces.  Jennifer Moore is a good example of someone interested in the color, texture and form of nature. 

I just know that I’ve been much more observant of nature’s design since I’ve started weaving and my garden provides much inspiration.

Today I’m going to turn you over to another site.  In April, I had the priviledge of doing an audio interview with artist and handweaver Kathie Roig for an episode of WeaveCast.  This wonderful podcast has been produced by Syne Mitchell for a number of years.  She has taken it to the next level offering not only audio, but great web content on WeaveZine including instruction, reviews and community information for handweavers.

Please visit this link to hear Kathie’s interview and then look around the rest of the site and see what you think.  Syne is taking a much deserved summer off from podcast production but there are many archived audio interviews for you to explore.

http://weavezine.com/audio/52-kathie-roig

You might also want to visit one of my postings regarding Kathie’s workshop for my guild.  It was a wonderful weekend experience.

https://betweenthethreads.wordpress.com/2010/04/19/painted-threads/

I’m not an artist by training.  In fact, I’ve been downright color challenged and that is why I own a color wheel.  It’s handy at the loom and travels with me to every workshop.  But there is no color wheel that beats the natural world.  Nature has a way of putting the right combination of colors in the right places every time.  Sometimes I just need to bring my stash outside to see what works.

A little green cotton and I think these colors will weave into something sensational.  I also might consider using the same colors in paint for a free form painted warp.

I love to think of the possibilities.  Now I just have to get busy and make it happen.

I’ve been fascinated by the concept of sacred geometry, the golden proportion, and the Fibonacci series.  I don’t quite understand it, but would love to explore it further.  When I saw this movie on YouTube, I was blown away by the way this artist so creatively illustrated it.

I’m continually dumbfounded by the connection between math, nature, and creation. Life is too beautiful to have been a random set of events.