As summer comes to an end, I find that I am often pulled away from my spinning and weaving to tend to the ebb and flow of the garden.  After all, this is what we’ve been waiting for; the harvest after all this work is upon us. Tomatoes must get picked, eggplant cut from the vine. 

It’s been a very productive year for my tomatoes, eggplant and beans. 

When the harvest comes into full swing from the middle of August until halfway through September, I spend more time with my cookbooks to see all the ways I can use this wonderful bounty.

But all is not lost on the fiber front.  Many of these wonderful vegetables deserve a slow cook.  Once they are in the pot simmering away, I can usually grab a few minutes at the spinning wheel trying to make some headway on a pile of roving.

Life requires balance.  We need time for our food, rest and fiber…oh and work too:)

The Winter Olympics are just nine days away!  I love the Olympics and watch everyday with my family, but I can’t simply sit there for hours in front of the t.v.  So I like to plan a fiber project to keep my hands busy.  Sometimes it’s knitting, sometimes lace tatting.  This year I’ll be spinning. 

 

This week, I’ve been preparing some roving that I handpainted a couple of summers ago, getting it ready to spin on my wheel the moment the Olympics begin.  I’ve been working at the drumcarder to blend what I call “impressionist” colors and open up the fibers to make it easier to draft. The colors were inspired by many of my favorite impressionist paintings at the Cleveland Museum of Art.

It’s interesting to see how the roving looks before it enters the carder and how the teeth spread it out and blend the colors.  I have a Louet Jr. drumcarder which is narrower than full sized carders, but it’s amazing how much I can load onto it.

               Look at the size of these batts!  They’re huge and fluffy.  I only carded the roving once because I don’t want the colors to blend into oblivion.

I have about 10 of these batts and it will take a good bit of time to spin; I’m not a very fast spinner but I should be able to but a dent in this stash of fiber by the time the Olympics end.

Now I just have to figure out what I’m going to do with the finished yarn.